Hiking western Death Valley National Park
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Hiking western Death Valley National Park Panamint, Saline, and Eureka Valley by Michel J. F. Digonnet

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Published by M. Digonnet in Palo Alto, Calif .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Hiking -- Death Valley National Park (Calif. and Nev.) -- Guidebooks,
  • Trails -- Death Valley National Park (Calif. and Nev.) -- Guidebooks,
  • Death Valley National Park (Calif. and Nev.) -- Guidebooks

Book details:

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references (p. 529-532) and indexes.

StatementMichel Digonnet.
GenreGuidebooks
Classifications
LC ClassificationsGV199.42.D42 D54 2009
The Physical Object
Paginationix, 554 p. :
Number of Pages554
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL23971071M
ISBN 100965917819
ISBN 109780965917810
LC Control Number2008911829
OCLC/WorldCa472778025

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Hiking Western Death Valley National Park: Panamint, Saline and Eureka Valleys by Michel Digonnet. This book provides a closer look at the trails on the west side (the best side) of the park. This book provides a closer look at the trails on the west side (the best side) of the s:   Hiking Western Death Valley National Park book. Read 2 reviews from the world's largest community for readers. Lost between the rugged High Sierras and s /5. Hiking Western Death Valley National Park. A hiking and four-wheeling paradise. Lost between the rugged High Sierras and sunbaked Death Valley, bypassed by most visitors on their way somewhere else, this sumptuous alignment of low desert valleys trapped between mountains reaching o feet is a little-known paradise waiting to be discovered. What are the directions to drive to Death Valley National Park - California Highway , the Badwater Road, The Scotty's Castle Road, and paved roads to Dante's View and Wildrose provide access to the major scenic viewpoints and historic points of interest.- More than miles of unpaved and 4-wheel drive roads provide access to wilderness.

Death Valley—the largest national park in the contiguous United States—is 93 percent untrammeled wilderness, making it a paradise for hikers and nature enthusiasts. Discover narrow canyons, vast dune fields, ancient lava flows, high alpine forests, scenic mountains, and . Death Valley National Park is the largest national park in the lower 48 states! This is two separate treks into two distinct mountain areas of the park. On each trip segment, we’ll backpack two or three miles from a remote dirt road and set up a base camp. From camp, we’ll day-hike and explore the high desert mountains and colorful canyons. The best hikes in Death Valley National Park will make you wonder why you ever wanted to go out in the heat. This massive park — the largest in the lower 48 — follows mile long Death Valley through blistering California desert. Whether you’re planning on backpacking the grueling Death Valley Traverse or just want to peak at its top trails, prepare for a trek unlike any other. A land of extremes, Death Valley National Park is home to a great diversity of life and scenery. Although this park is known for the steady drought and record summer heat in its below-sea-level basin, visitors can also find towering peaks covered in winter snow, lush oases that are a refuge for local wildlife and tiny fish, and vast fields of wildflowers that bloom after a rare rainstorm.

  At million acres, Death Valley is the largest national park south of Alaska. And like that state, it’s still a frontier. Humans haven’t yet plumbed all its passageways—just last year, canyoneers in the Grapevine Mountains discovered foot-high Moonlight Bridge. SAVE! See Tripadvisor's Death Valley National Park, Inyo County hotel deals and special prices on 21 hotels all in one spot. Find the perfect hotel within your budget with reviews from real travelers. A Death Valley hiking tour takes you to the best highlights of this amazing national park, where you can get up close and personal and discover the magic for yourself. Our Death Valley backpacking trips take you deep into the backcountry, where you soak up incredible solitude, drink from unlikely oases, and explore remote : Scott Cundy. Backpacking in Death Valley National can be challenging, but the opportunities for experiencing solitude, sweeping vistas, dark night skies and awesome geology abound within the three million acres of designated are few established trails in the park, but hikers can follow canyon bottoms, open desert washes, alluvial fans and abandoned dirt roads to get around.